Dew of the sea, rosemary

 

FUNCTIONS: ANTIOXIDANT, ANTIBACTERIAL, CLEANSING, SOOTHING, CALMING, RELAXING, REPAIRING

Rosemary ( Rosmarinus Officinalis) is a small evergreen plant that belongs in the mint family and its fragnant leaves are used to season foods.  Ιn Latin, rosemary means dew (ros) of the sea (marinus) because it was believed that the plant the sea dew was sufficient for the plant to grow. It is originated in the Mediterranean region and grows in warm climates. In the ancient times, rosemary was believed to enhance memory whereas in literature it represented remembrance and fidelity. Recently, a small village southern of Naples, Acciaroli, raised great interest among the researchers because of the longevity of its residents who consume daily a variety of a locally grown rosemary.

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WHAT CAN ROSEMARY FLOWER WATER DO FOR SKIN & OVERALL HEALTH

Rosemary has a dual aspect; toning and deeply relaxing. It is ideal for all skin types but especially for oily or irritated skin.

  • Enhances skin’s elasticity, regenerates skin cells, heals wounds faster and reduces the appearance of age spots.

  • Activates circulation and purifies the skin surface.

  • Fights hair loss and promotes strong, shiny hair.

  • Treats oily scalp and reduces dandruff.

  • Its anti-bacterial properties treat irritated skin and fight skin infections such as acne.

  • Might help relieve headaches and tensions.

  • Soothes sore muscle joints pains caused by rheumatism and arthritis.


HOW TO USE IT

  • Facial toner:  Spray rosemary water onto your face until its wet and leave on to dry. Follow with your normal moisturiser. You may use daily.

  • Makeup setter: Spray rosemary water all over your face and neck after having applied your make up and let it dry. It will set your make up and keep it fresh for a longer time.

  • Hair: Add rosemary water to your last hair rinse every few days for strong, shiny oil-free hair.

  • Bath: Add two cups of rosemary water in warm water to sooth muscle and joint pains.

 

 

 


The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of ROWSE, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.